logo
  • police-content

  • HOW TO MAKE AN EMERGENCY 9-1-1 CALL

    1. Stay calm. Don't get excited. Take a deep breath.  
    2. Dial 9-1-1 right away. Don't wait for someone else to call.  
    3. Tell the person who answers the phone exactly what is wrong.  
    4. Tell them the exact address where help is needed. Be sure to give them the FULL address, including any apartment number, suite number, etc.  
    5. Tell them the phone number you are calling from. If you are not at the same address as the emergency, tell them the address where you are.  
    6. Tell them your name.  
    7. DO NOT HANG UP until the person on the phone tells you to do so. They may need to ask you for more information to help the fire, police or ambulance find you.  
     
    The dispatcher will ask you specific questions, such as, "What are you reporting?" - "Where did this occur?" - "When did this occur?" - "What is the phone number you 
    are calling from?" - "Where are you now?" - "Are there any weapons involved?"  
     
    Many questions may be asked to gather specific details of the event. Understand that the dispatcher is sending the appropriate personnel to the location while they have you on the phone. In emergency situations the dispatchers are giving your information to the appropriate responding personnel while you are on the phone with them. Total cooperation with the dispatcher is paramount. 
     

    HOW THE 9-1-1 DISPATCH PROCESS WORKS

    1. A citizen dials 9-1-1 in an emergency situation.
    2. The caller's telephone provider automatically routes the call to the appropriate public safety agency.
    3. A 9-1-1 operator receives the call. If the call is from a non-cellular phone, the caller's name, address and telephone number appears on the computer screen.
    4. The 9-1-1 operator confirms that information and will ask the caller about the emergency and enter the information into a computer database called CAD (computer aided dispatch).
    5. While questioning the caller, the sends the information via computer to a police dispatcher.
    6. The dispatcher receives the information about the emergency and dispatches the appropriate personnel to handle the call for service.

     

    NON EMERGENCY / 626-744-4241

    1. A citizen dial the non-emergency phone number for the police department.
    2. The caller's telephone provider / caller identification information does NOT transmit.
    3. A dispatcher / call taker receives the call is ready to begin to enter the callers information into a computer database called CAD (computer aided dispatch).
    4. While questioning the caller, the dispatcher / call taker sends the information via computer to a police radio dispatcher.
    5. The police radio dispatcher receives the information about the call for service and dispatches the appropriate personnel to handle the call for service.
     

     CALLS ARE DISPATCHED USING A PRIORITY SYSTEM 

        

    Calls for Service  

    Default Priority Classification*  

    Priority 1: The highest priority call in which an event is in-progress or just-occurred and there is an immediate threat to personal safety. 

    Most critical missing person cases fall in this category. 

    Priority 2:  A very high priority call in which a crime is in-progress or just-occurred and there is immediate threat to property and/or the possibility of apprehending a suspect is high. 

    Injury traffic collisions are included in this priority because medical personnel may enter the scene before officers arrive to render aid.  If medical personnel advise of an extended ETA, the priority should be upgraded to Priority 1 to expedite the response.  

    Standard missing person cases fall in this category. 

    Priority 3: An active incident that does not meet the criteria for Priority 1 or 2 (excluding missing persons)  

    Calls that fall in the Priority 4 or 5 categories where the RP is not waiting comfortably at home or work (station; parking lot; etc.) should be upgraded to Priority 3 for an expedited response. 

    Priority 4:  Cold report calls that must be handled by sworn personnel (excluding missing person).  

    If the RP is not waiting comfortably at home or work, upgrade to Priority 3 for an expedited response. 

    Priority 5: Cold calls that meet the criteria for handling by civilian field personnel.  

    If the RP is not waiting comfortably at home or work, upgrade to Priority 3 for an expedited response. 

    Priority 6: Incidents that do not require a dispatched response.  917A, EXSER – many of which are initiated outside of Field Operations.  As examples, delayed reports processed in Records, Custodial reports initiated in the Jail, and Reports generated in Detectives.  Also officer initiated traffic. 

     

       

     

     

     

     

     

     
     

Water Usage Gauge